Margaret’s Hug Healing Prayer Shawl | Free Crochet Chart


I think I have said before that one of the patterns I am most proud of is my Margaret’s Hug Healing / Prayer Shawl. Since I shared this free pattern, and the story of it’s creation, in February 2014 on Ravelry alone it has now been downloaded over 40 thousand times!

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Some of you have asked after my mother-in-law, after who the shawl was named, and I’m sorry to say that she lost her battle with cancer nearly two years ago.  Margaret was a midwife / nurse all her working life and a kinder, more caring person you couldn’t wish to meet – she is very much missed by us all everyday! But I believe her legacy lives on in the idea of this shawl; I’m sure she would love the idea of her namesake being used to support people in need.

Many of you have shared your your own projects and your own stories about making the shawl for yourselves and for others. I want to thank you all for sharing details of what has often been a challenging time for you, friends and family – and for anyone still struggling I send you much love and well wishes. 

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I have had a few people contact me to say they have had trouble making up the shawl, I did make a rather shaky video (available here) to try and help. I’ll be the first to admit it’s not the best demonstration and I will hopefully be working on making a better video as soon as I’m able! But in the interim I thought charting up the pattern for you might help. 

Margaret-Shawl-Chart

The downloadable pattern has now been updated with the chart and is available for download from Ravelry and LoveCrochet.com.

This shawl will always be a free pattern so others can make a hug for someone in need; however if you would like to pass on the couple of pounds/dollars you would have paid for this pattern to Cancer Research then that would make you extremely awesome!

Until next time; keep calm and crochet on my friends xx

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Happily Hooked Magazine | Parchment Meadow Pillow


So you guys have heard me talk about Happily Hooked Magazine before right? Well if you haven’t heard of it it’s a monthly online US magazine for crocheters filled with patterns, articles, interviews and more PATTERNS!

Issue 36 of Happily Hooked has now hit the e-newstands with 10+ pretty and practical home decor projects, and I’m really thrilled to have a brand spanking new cushion design exclusive to this months magazine. 

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The Parchment Meadow Cushion is a large 40.5cm x 40.5cm (16 x 16 inch) square cushion patterned with soft, pretty coloured meadow flowers on a plain natural coloured background. 

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Decorate your bed or couch with this chunky pillow with contrasting crocheted and embroidered motifs. Perfect to mix and match with plain cushions.

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I had great fun with this design incorporating 3-D meadow flowers on the textured parchment – and did I say how much I LOVE the texture of this pillow (so did my testers!). 

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What is very exciting, since the last time I worked with Happily Hooked Magazine, is that they now offer a print + digital version of the magazine where each month you get a printed copy, with patterns from the previous 2 issues! 

Check out the Happily Hooked Magazine website for more details about the magazine and how you can subscribe and you can add the pillow pattern to your 💗 Favourites and Ravelry Queue here.

Well until next time, happy hooking and keep calm and crochet on my friends xx

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2016 in a Nutshell


I thought I’d do a little review of my hooky year in pictures…

January saw the release of the biggest thing I worked on all year. It’s also the item and design which I am ultimately most proud of. The Everything Is Cool and Groovyghan 2016 Crochet-A-Long is definitely the most challenging thing I have designed and shared so far and the finished groovyghans made by other crafters have just blown me away (you lot are amazing!). Although the crochet-a-long has now finished you can still make a groovyghan of your very own by checking out the details on the blog here.

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February and March I was busy growing a human which turned out to be quite hard work! So, aside from the groovyghan, there wasn’t a whole lot of crocheting going on…

Then in April my new shawl pattern, The Spring Blossom Wrap, was released in iLikeCrochet Magazine. Worked in a smooth 4ply cotton yarn and a 3.5mm hook I was really pleased with the floral look I eventually achieved on this shawl which I based on cherry blossoms.

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In May and June baby had finally arrived so I got back to a little hooking by working up some quick little hats and a headband for my new arrival. I just chose some patterns on Ravelry that I liked the look of and they actually turned out to be all free patterns. The hats and tie back I made include the Sedge Stitch Newborn Beanie, the Bonnie Bell Bonnet, the TopKnot Baby Hat and the 15 Minute Tieback.  The Bonnie Bell Bonnet was one of the first hats I hooked up. It’s such a cute design and as its worked in Aran (Worsted) weight yarn it’s very quick to work up.

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In July I hooked up a little Amineko cat for Little G’s summer fayre, such a fun design and super cute!

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In August and September I was working on some exciting patterns for October (more on that later) but I still found time to hook up a little Pumpkin hat for the baby and Baabara for this years Yarndale charity project

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and I finally finished a work in progress which had been started a year previously! The Corner to Corner Granny Stitch Throw  was a great pattern to use up loads of odds and ends of double knit in my stash…

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So October was a busy and exciting month; my RainBOW Clip Organiser was released in Issue 31 of Happily Hooked Magazine…and I was completely delighted to be asked to take part in the Stylecraft Blog Tour for 2016 for which I designed the Harmonious Hexagon Blanket (free pattern here).

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In November and December I hooked up several Christmassy items for my girls including some cute Elfin baby boots and some fabulous elf hats. I also hooked up a fab little mouse baby hat for a Micky fan – unfortunately this particular pattern is no longer available, there are plenty of alternatives out there though if you are looking for this style.  

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I also hooked up my special animals from my TOFT yarn and some awesome little Princesses for some gorgeous little girls; but I’m going to blog about those later so I’ll save those ta-dah moments for 2017!

Wow, I enjoyed that stroll down memory lane! I find when it’s all written down like this that I have accomplished more than I realised! Crochet is such a big part of my life that sometimes I forget what I have been up to in the year as I’m concentrating on the next design or project.  The most fantastic thing about crochet is that it continually brings me happiness, fun challenges, surprises, satisfaction at a job completed and most of all relaxation. 

So what can you look forward to in 2017 from me?

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I have so many plans for 2017! I’m extremely excited to be working with several crochet magazines this year on new designs, I’ve also got various exciting collaborations coming up, I’m going to be catching up with patterns that I didn’t finish due to being pregnant (and ill) and then having a newborn (for those waiting for Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds – this is at the top of the list!) AND we’ve got a brand new crochet-a-long to look forward to (starting in March) which is also in development behind the scenes as we speak.

Finally I’d like to say a mahoosive thank you to everyone who has followed me on the blog or on social media in 2016…

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My thanks is to everyone who may have brought and/or made any of my patterns, who have read my musings following me here on the blog and for those who have offered / or continued to offer their hands in friendship. I cannot tell you how much I appreciate your support, enthusiasm and your camaraderie and how much I love to see your finished work!

Well until next time, happy hooking and keep calm and crochet on my friends xx

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KCACO-UK Groovyghan CAL 2016 | Part 12


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Oooo time for part 12 of our groovyghan! If this is the first you are hearing about this CAL the full schedule can be found here, to link the groovyghan project on Ravelry click here, or for just this pattern click here.  There is a Facebook support group for this CAL which can be found here and you can use the hashtag #kcacoukcal2016 for FacebookTwitter, Pinterest and Instagram if you want to link in photos and such like on social media.  

For a print friendly version of this page please scroll to the bottom of this post and click on  the Print & PDF button.

Edited to add: This page has now been translated to Hebrew by the lovely Sarit Grinberg: Cats-Claw-Stripes-Hebrew

Part 12: Cats Claw Stripes:

During the stylish 1960’s and 70’s it was very fashionable and perfectly legal in the UK to keep exotic animals as household pets, these ranged from leopards, pumas and panthers! However in 1976 the UK Government introduced the Dangerous Wild Animals Act to protect the public and ensure the animals we’re looked after properly.  

When I was younger I used to live pretty much next to Cannock Chase where there was a rumour of a panther at large – my brother and I had much fun scaring each other with tales of the beast roaming the ancient woodlands looking for juicy children to eat!  So this weeks section of the groovyghan is inspired by the claws of these big cats!

As with all the parts to this CAL I have included both the written pattern, chart and a photo tutorial of how I have made this pattern below.

01

Written Pattern:

skill2

Part 12: Cats Claw Stripes:

Notes:

  • Hook: UK 4 mm / US Size G
  • Yarn: Double Knit / 8 ply / Weight #3
  • Gauge using Double Knit / 8 ply / Weight #3: 6 tr/dc sts = 1.5 inches / 3.8 cm

If your gauge is different to mine e.g. because you are using a bigger hook and heavier weight yarn all you will need to do is check your own gauge and stick to it – this should mean that the pattern should fit together at the end.

  • Row width = 50 inches / 127 cm
  • Row height = 5 inches / 12.7 cm

Pattern uses English (UK) and American (US) crochet terms for a conversion chart click here.

Abbreviations: 

  • st(s) = stitch(es)
  • sp = space
  • sl st = slip stitch
  • ch(s) = chain  
  • FDC/FSC = Foundation UK Double / US Single Crochet
  • htr/hdc = UK half treble / US half double crochet
  • tr/dc  = UK treble / US double crochet
  • FPttr / FPdtr = UK front post triple treble Crochet / US front post double treble crochet
  • BPttr / BPdtr = UK back post triple treble Crochet / US back post double treble crochet

Stitch Guidance: 

  • Foundation UK Double / US Single Crochet (FDC/FSC):  Start with a slip knot on your hook, ch 2, * insert hook in 2nd ch from hook, pull up a loop, yarn over, pull through 1 loop, yarn over, and pull through 2 loops * – 1 FDC/FSC single crochet made with its own chain at bottom, repeat from * to * until you have made the required number of chains.
  • UK Half Double Treble / US Half Double Crochet (htr/hdc): Yarn over, insert hook in indicated st and pull up a loop (three loops on hook), yarn over, pull through all three loops on hook.
  • UK Treble / US Double Crochet (tr/dc): Yarn over, insert hook in indicated st and pull up a loop (three loops on hook), yarn over, pull through two loops, yarn over, pull through remaining two loops on hook.
  • UK front post triple treble Crochet / US front post double treble crochet (FPttr / FPdtr): Yarn over 3 times and insert hook from front to back to front around post of stitch two rows below, yarn over and pull up a loop, [Yarn over and draw through 2 loops on hook] 4 times.
  • UK back post triple treble Crochet / US back post double treble crochet (BPttr / BPdtr): Yarn over 3 times and insert hook from back to front to back around post of stitch two rows below, yarn over and pull up a loop, [Yarn over and draw through 2 loops on hook] 4 times.

Pattern:

Row 1:  With YARN A, FDC/FSC 167 sts, turn (167 sts)

Row 2: Ch 2 (counts as first htr/hdc), 1 htr/hdc in each st along until end (167 sts)

Row 3:  Ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), 1 tr/dc in each st along until end, , finish off YARN A and weave in ends (167 sts)

Row 4: Attach YARN B to the beginning of the row in the top of the last tr/dc made. Ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), 1 tr/dc in the next 4 sts, * 1 FPttr/FPdtr in the next 2 sts, 1 tr/dc in the next 3 sts * repeat from * to * until the last 7 sts, 1 FPttr/FPdtr in the next 2 sts, 1 tr/dc in the last 5 sts, turn (103 tr/dc / 64 FPttr/FPdtr)

Row 5: Ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), 1 tr/dc in each st along until end, finish off YARN B and weave in ends (167 sts)

Row 6: Attach YARN C to the top of the last st made, ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), 1 tr/dc in each st along until end (167 sts)

Row 7: Ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), 1 tr/dc in the next 4 sts, * 1 BPttr/BPdtr in the next 2 sts, 1 tr/dc in the next 3 sts * repeat from * to * until the last 7 sts, 1 BPttr/BPdtr in the next 2 sts, 1 tr/dc in the last 5 sts, finish off YARN C and weave in ends (103 tr/dc / 64 BPttr/BPdtr)

Row 8: Attach YARN D to the top of the last st made, ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), 1 tr/dc in each st along until end (167 sts)

Row 9: Ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), 1 tr/dc in each st along until end, finish off YARN D and weave in ends (167 sts)

Row 10: Attach YARN E in the top of the last st made. Ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), 1 tr/dc in the next 4 sts, * 1 FPttr/FPdtr in the next 2 sts, 1 tr/dc in the next 3 sts * repeat from * to * until the last 7 sts, 1 FPttr/FPdtr in the next 2 sts, 1 tr/dc in the last 5 sts (103 tr/dc / 64 FPttr/FPdtr).  

Row 11: Ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), 1 tr/dc in each st along until end, finish off YARN E and weave in ends (167 sts)

Chart:

For crochet symbols in English (UK) and American (US) crochet terms click here.

COMING SOON!

Apologies for not having the chart ready yet – you’ll have to blame the baby ;o)

Blocking:

As Part 12 is in one long strip I don’t think you will have any problems with curling, however if you think your work might benefit from blocking please see the previous CAL post for more guidance.

Joining:

You can now join part 12 directly to parts 8-10 (please refer to the CAL schematic below for details) by slip stitching in the back loop only on the wrong side of the work (you could also single crochet either through the back loop or through both loops to join).

  • Tip 1: Use stitch markers or knit clips to hold your pieces steady and lined up whilst you join them together; line up your pieces so the edges and stitches match.
  • Tip 2: Do not pull your yarn too tight when working your joins. Generally you should have the same sort of stretch that your piece has. 

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Photo Tutorial: Cats Claw Stripes

Row 1:  With YARN A, FDC/FSC 167 sts, turn (167 sts)

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Row 2: Ch 2 (counts as first htr/hdc), 1 htr/hdc in each st along until end (167 sts)

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Row 3:  Ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), 1 tr/dc in each st along until end, , finish off YARN A and weave in ends (167 sts)

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Row 4: Attach YARN B to the beginning of the row in the top of the last htr/hdc made. Ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), 1 tr/dc in the next 4 sts, * 1 FPttr/FPdtr in the next 2 sts, 1 tr/dc in the next 3 sts * repeat from * to * until the last 7 sts, 1 FPttr/FPdtr in the next 2 sts, 1 tr/dc in the last 5 sts, turn (103 tr/dc / 64 FPttr/FPdtr)

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Row 5: Ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), 1 tr/dc in each st along until end, finish off YARN B and weave in ends (167 sts)

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Row 6: Attach YARN C to the top of the last st made, ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), 1 tr/dc in each st along until end (167 sts)

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Row 7: Ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), 1 tr/dc in the next 4 sts, * 1 BPttr/BPdtr in the next 2 sts, 1 tr/dc in the next 3 sts * repeat from * to * until the last 7 sts, 1 BPttr/BPdtr in the next 2 sts, 1 tr/dc in the last 5 sts, finish off YARN C and weave in ends (103 tr/dc / 64 BPttr/BPdtr)

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Row 8: Attach YARN D to the top of the last st made, ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), 1 tr/dc in each st along until end (167 sts)

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Row 9: Ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), 1 tr/dc in each st along until end, finish off YARN D and weave in ends (167 sts)

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Row 10: Attach YARN E in the top of the last st made. Ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), 1 tr/dc in the next 4 sts, * 1 FPttr/FPdtr in the next 2 sts, 1 tr/dc in the next 3 sts * repeat from * to * until the last 7 sts, 1 FPttr/FPdtr in the next 2 sts, 1 tr/dc in the last 5 sts (103 tr/dc / 64 FPttr/FPdtr).  

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Row 11: Ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), 1 tr/dc in each st along until end, finish off YARN D and weave in ends (167 sts)

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And that’s it! Part 12 completed!

Don’t forget to stay tuned for Part 13 to be released on 29 June 2016.

KCACO-UK Groovyghan CAL 2016 | Part 10


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Well here we are at part 10, released a little earlier than scheduled (I didn’t think you would mind) as I have a family matter I have to deal with this week which meant I couldn’t bank on getting this blog post out to the world on Wednesday.

The exciting thing about part 10 is that means you’ve pretty much completed over half of the finished blanket.  I do hope you are enjoying the crochet journey so far!

If this is the first you are hearing about this CAL the full schedule can be found here, to link the groovyghan project on Ravelry click here, or for just this pattern click here.  There is a Facebook support group for this CAL which can be found here and you can use the hashtag #kcacoukcal2016 for FacebookTwitter, Pinterest and Instagram if you want to link in photos and such like on social media.  

For a print friendly version of this page please scroll to the bottom of this post and click on  the Print & PDF button.

Edited to add: This page has now been translated to Hebrew by the lovely Sarit Grinberg: Go-go-Herringbone-10-inch-Granny-Square-hebrew-final

Part 10: Go-Go Herringbone 10 inch Block 

This weeks CAL square is not the grooviest of all the pieces we are going to make but it’s an integral part of bringing the whole design together.  Inspired by go-go dancers of the 1960’s this block uses a standard stitch…but with a twist!  The overall effect is a lightly textured fabric with a subtle zig-zag effect that is very pleasing!

As with all the parts to this CAL I have included both the written pattern, chart and a photo tutorial of how I have made this pattern below.

01

Written Pattern:

skill2

Part 10: Go-Go Herringbone 10 inch Block (Make 2):

Notes:

  • Hook: UK 4 mm / US Size G
  • Yarn: Double Knit / 8 ply / Weight #3
  • Yarn Amount required: Each panel roughly uses up  125 yds / 50g / 150 m
  • Gauge using Double Knit / 8 ply / Weight #3: 6 tr/dc sts = 1.5 inches / 3.8 cm

If your gauge is different to mine e.g. because you are using a bigger hook and heavier weight yarn all you will need to do is check your own gauge and stick to it – this should mean that the pattern should fit together at the end.

  • Finished panel size using Double Knit / 8 ply / Weight #3: 10 x 10 inches /25.4 x 25.4 cm cm (your block will be slightly larger if using worsted / aran / 10ply / yarn weight #4)

Pattern uses English (UK) and American (US) crochet terms for a conversion chart click here.

Abbreviations: 

  • st(s) = stitch(es)
  • sp = space
  • sl st = slip stitch
  • ch(s) = chain  
  • FDC/FSC = Foundation UK Double / US Single Crochet
  • HBhtr/HBhdc  = Herringbone UK half treble / Herringbone US half double crochet

Stitch Guidance: 

  • Foundation UK Double / US Single Crochet (FDC/FSC):  Start with a slip knot on your hook, ch 2, * insert hook in 2nd ch from hook, pull up a loop, yarn over, pull through 1 loop, yarn over, and pull through 2 loops * – 1 FDC/FSC single crochet made with its own chain at bottom, repeat from * to * until you have made the required number of chains.  For a photo tutorial of FDC/FSC please see part 2 of this CAL.
  • Herringbone Half Treble / Herringbone Half Double Crochet (HBhtr/HBhdc): Your stitch should slant to the left; when worked in rows it creates a herringbone effect. Yarn over, insert the hook into the next st, yarn over and pull the loop through the st AND through the first loop on the hook (two loops on hook), yarn over, draw through both loops on hook. 

Pattern:

  • Note 1: I used multiple colours for this block but you could make the panel in any amount of colours you like.
  • The ch 1 after a turn does not count as a st

Row 1: FDC/FSC 33 sts, turn, ch 1 (33 sts)

Row 2: HBhtr/HBhdc in each st along until end, turn, ch 1 (33 sts)

Row 3: HBhtr/HBhdc in each st along until end, finish off and weave in ends (33 sts)

Row 4: Attach new colour to the last st created, ch 1, 1 HBhtr/HBhdc in the same st as beginning ch 1 and in each st along until end, turn, ch 1 (33 sts)

Row 5: HBhtr/HBhdc in each st along until end, turn, ch 1 (33 sts)

Row 6: HBhtr/HBhdc in each st along until end, finish off and weave in ends (33 sts)

Row 7 – 30: Repeat rows 4-6

Finishing: Very loosely (as otherwise it will make your panel curl up) slip st along the short edges of your work 33 times (so you have 33 sts on each ‘turned’ end) to neaten your panel and to help with any joining.

02

Chart:

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(c) http://www.designz.shibaguyz.com

KCACOUKCAL2016-PART10

For crochet symbols in English (UK) and American (US) crochet terms click here.

Joining:

  • Tip 1: Use stitch markers or knit clips to hold your squares steady and lined up whilst you join them together.
  • Tip 2: Do not pull your yarn too tight when working your joins. Generally you should have the same sort of stretch that the crochet squares have.

Join your blocks as per the CAL schematic (details below) for PART 10 by slip stitching in the front loop only on the wrong side of the work; I chose to add my stripes vertically but choose the way you prefer for your blanket.

Groovyghan-Numbered-Part10

Photo Tutorial:

Herringbone Half Double Treble / Herringbone Half Double Crochet (HBhtr/HBhdc):

Yarn over, insert the hook into the next st, yarn over and pull the loop through the st AND through the first loop on the hook (two loops on hook),

HBhdc01

yarn over, draw through both loops on hook. 

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Part 10: Go-Go Herringbone 10 inch Block (Make 2):

Row 1: FDC/FSC 33 sts, turn, ch 1 (33 sts)

TUT01

Row 2: HBhtr/HBhdc in each st along until end, turn, ch 1 (33 sts)

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Row 3: HBhtr/HBhdc in each st along until end, finish off and weave in ends (33 sts)

TUT03

Row 4: Attach new colour to the last st created, ch 1, 1 HBhtr/HBhdc in the same st as beginning ch 1 and in each st along until end, turn, ch 1 (33 sts)

TUT04

Row 5: HBhtr/HBhdc in each st along until end, turn, ch 1 (33 sts)

TUT05

Row 6: HBhtr/HBhdc in each st along until end, finish off and weave in ends (33 sts)

TUT06.jpg

Row 7 – 30: Repeat rows 4-6

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Finishing: Very loosely (as otherwise it will make your panel curl up) slip st along the short edges of your work 33 times (so you have 33 sts on each ‘turned’ end) to neaten your panel and to help with any joining.

And that’s it! Part 10 completed!

Don’t forget to stay tuned for Part 11 to be released on 1st June 2016.

KCACO-UK Groovyghan CAL 2016 | Part 6


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Time for part 6 of our groovyghan! If this is the first you are hearing about this CAL the full schedule can be found here, to link the groovyghan project on Ravelry click here, or for just this pattern click here.  There is a Facebook support group for this CAL which can be found here and you can use the hashtag #kcacoukcal2015 for FacebookTwitter, Pinterest and Instagram if you want to link in photos and such like on social media.  

For a print friendly version of this page please scroll to the bottom of this post and click on  the Print & PDF button.

Edited to add: This page has now been translated to by the lovely Sarit Grinberg: groovyghan-part6-hebrew

Part 6: Florentine Bargello Stripes:

Bargello Crochet is a term given to crochet patterns inspired by traditional Bargello (sometimes called ‘Florentine’) Needlework designs. This sort of design became popular in the 1970’s as a part of the New Age Movement which is why it’s perfect to include in our groovyghan (plus I’ve always wanted to have a go at it!).

As with all the parts to this CAL I have included both the written pattern, chart and a photo tutorial of how I have made this pattern below.

02

Written Pattern:

skill2

Part 6: Florentine Bargello Stripes:

Notes:

  • Hook: UK 4 mm / US Size G
  • Yarn: Double Knit / 8 ply / Weight #3
  • Gauge using Double Knit / 8 ply / Weight #3: 6 tr/dc sts = 1.5 inches / 3.8 cm

If your gauge is different to mine e.g. because you are using a bigger hook and heavier weight yarn all you will need to do is check your own gauge and stick to it – this should mean that the pattern should fit together at the end.

  • Row width = 30 inches / 76.2 cm
  • Row height = 5 inches / 12.7 cm

Pattern uses English (UK) and American (US) crochet terms for a conversion chart click here.

Abbreviations: 

  • st(s) = stitch(es)
  • sp = space
  • sl st = slip stitch
  • ch(s) = chain  
  • FDC/FSC = Foundation UK Double / US Single Crochet
  • htr/hdc = UK half treble / US half double crochet
  • tr/dc  = UK treble / US double crochet
  • BLO = Back Loop Only

Stitch Guidance: 

  • Foundation UK Double / US Single Crochet (FDC/FSC):  Start with a slip knot on your hook, ch 2, * insert hook in 2nd ch from hook, pull up a loop, yarn over, pull through 1 loop, yarn over, and pull through 2 loops * – 1 FDC/FSC single crochet made with its own chain at bottom, repeat from * to * until you have made the required number of chains.
  • UK Half Double Treble / US Half Double Crochet (htr/hdc): Yarn over, insert hook in indicated st and pull up a loop (three loops on hook), yarn over, pull through all three loops on hook.
  • UK Treble / US Double Crochet (tr/dc): Yarn over, insert hook in indicated st and pull up a loop (three loops on hook), yarn over, pull through two loops, yarn over, pull through remaining two loops on hook.
  • Row Start / Row End Bargello Cluster = Ch 3, 1 tr/dc in the same st as beginning ch 3 and in the next 4 sts, ch 3, 1 tr/dc in the same st as the last tr/dc just made.
  • Bargello Cluster = Ch 3, 1 tr/dc in the same st as beginning ch 3 and in the next 3 sts, ch 3, 1 tr/dc in the same st as the last tr/dc just made.

Pattern:

  • Note 1: The ch 3 at the start and end of each bargello cluster does not count as a stitch in any part of the pattern; rows should be worked into sl sts, htr/hdc or tr/dc sts only.

Row 1:  With YARN A, FDC/FSC 167 sts, turn (167 sts)

Row 2: Ch 1 (doesn’t count as a st), 1 htr/hdc in same st as beginning ch 1 and in each st along until end, turn (167 sts)

Row 3: Rnd 3: Ch 3, 1 tr/dc in the same st as beginning ch 3 and in the next 4 sts, ch 3, sl st in the same st as the last tr/dc, sl st in the next 3 sts, * ch 3, 1 tr/dc in the same stitch as the beginning ch 3 and the next 2 sts, ch 3, sl st in the same st as the last tr/dc just made, sl st in the next 3 sts * repeat from * to * until you reach the last 5 sts, ch 3, 1 tr/dc in the same st as beginning ch 3 and in the next 4 sts, ch 3, sl st in the same st as the last tr/dc just made, turn, finish off and weave in ends (167 sts / 2 x Start / End Bargello Clusters / 31 Bargello Clusters)

Row 4: Miss the ch 3 and attach YARN B to the beginning of the row (wrong side facing) in the top of the first tr/dc. Ch 1, sl st in the same st as the ch 1, sl st in the BLO of the next 4 sts, 1 tr/dc in the centre 2 sl sts of the previous row, * sl st in the BLO of the next 3 sts, 1 tr/dc in the next 2 centre sl sts from the previous row * repeat from * to * until the last 5 sts, sl st in the BLO of the next 5 sts, turn (167 sts)

Row 5: Ch 2 (doesn’t count as a st), 1 tr/dc in the same st as the beginning ch 1 and in each st along until the end (167 sts)

Row 6: Repeat row 3, at the end of the row, finish off and weave in ends (167 sts)

Row 7: With YARN C repeat row 4

Row 8: Repeat row 5

Row 9: Repeat row 3

Row 10: With YARN D repeat row 4

Row 11: Repeat row 5

Row 12: Repeat row 3

Row 13: With YARN E repeat row 4

Row 14: Repeat row 5

Row 15: Repeat row 3

Row 16: With YARN A repeat row 4, finish off and weave in ends.

See below for details on blocking and joining your squares together to complete Part 5 of the CAL and below that a photo tutorial for the pattern.

Chart:

KCACOUKCAL2016-PART6

For crochet symbols in English (UK) and American (US) crochet terms click here.

Blocking:

As Part 6 is in one long strip I don’t think you will have any problems with curling, however if you think your work might benefit from blocking please see the previous CAL post for more guidance.

Joining:

You can now join part 6 directly to parts 1-5 (please refer to the CAL schematic below for details) by slip stitching in the back loop only on the wrong side of the work (you could also single crochet either through the back loop or through both loops to join).

  • Tip 1: Use stitch markers or knit clips to hold your pieces steady and lined up whilst you join them together; line up your pieces so the edges and stitches match.
  • Tip 2: Do not pull your yarn too tight when working your joins. Generally you should have the same sort of stretch that your piece has. 

Groovyghan-Numbered-Part6

Photo Tutorial: Florentine Bargello Stripes

Row 1:  With YARN A, FDC/FSC 167 sts, turn (167 sts)

TUT-01

Row 2: Ch 1 (doesn’t count as a st), 1 htr/hdc in same st as beginning ch 1 and in each st along until end, turn (167 sts)

TUT-02

Row 3: Rnd 3: Ch 3, 1 tr/dc in the same st as beginning ch 3 and in the next 4 sts, ch 3, sl st in the same st as the last tr/dc,

TUT-03

sl st in the next 3 sts, * ch 3,

TUT-04

1 tr/dc in the same stitch as the beginning ch 3 and the next 2 sts, ch 3, sl st in the same st as the last tr/dc just made, sl st in the next 3 sts

TUT-05

* repeat from * to * until you reach the last 5 sts, ch 3, 1 tr/dc in the same st as beginning ch 3 and in the next 4 sts, ch 3, sl st in the same st as the last tr/dc just made, turn, finish off and weave in ends (167 sts / 2 x Start / End Bargello Clusters / 31 Bargello Clusters)

TUT-06

Row 4: Miss the ch 3 and attach YARN B to the beginning of the row in the top of the first tr/dc. Ch 1, sl st in the same st as the ch 1, sl st in the BLO of the next 4 sts, 1 tr/dc in the centre 2 sl sts of the previous row, * sl st in the BLO of the next 3 sts, 1 tr/dc in the next 2 centre sl sts from the previous row * repeat from * to * until the last 5 sts, sl st in the BLO of the next 5 sts, turn (167 sts)

TUT-07

Row 5: Ch 2 (doesn’t count as a st), 1 tr/dc in the same st as the beginning ch 1 and in each st along until the end (167 sts)

TUT-08

Row 6: Repeat row 3, at the end of the row, finish off and weave in ends (167 sts)

TUT-09

Row 7: With YARN C repeat row 4

TUT-10

Row 8: Repeat row 5

TUT-11

Row 9: Repeat row 3

TUT-12

Row 10: With YARN D repeat row 4

Row 11: Repeat row 5

Row 12: Repeat row 3

TUT-13

Row 13: With YARN E repeat row 4

Row 14: Repeat row 5

Row 15: Repeat row 3

TUT-14

Row 16: With YARN A repeat row 4, finish off and weave in ends.

And that’s it! Part 6 completed!

Don’t forget to stay tuned for Part 7 to be released on 6th April 2016.

British vs. American Crochet Terms: What’s the Difference?


TermsSo I was asked something recently over on my Facebook page which I thought was a VERY interesting question!

Hey there! we are having a conversation on “Official CCC Social Group” a crochet page, about the difference between UK and US naming instructions. I used your Part one CAL, Groovyghan as an example link. I have some UKers that had no idea what I was talking about?! Could you explain why a SC in US is DC in UK?
Thanks so much!

I was taught by my Mum and Nana how to crochet and, living as I do in the UK, was taught using British terminology.  Like many people I didn’t even realise that there was another type of terminology until I really got into crochet as an adult.  

The difference between the two terms was a bit of a bug bear for me at first (until I became more crochet-bilingual) as I found some amazingly lovely patterns that were written in American terms but I found I was forever having to go back to check the terminology section to make sure I was crocheting the right stitch. And once you’ve crocheted a UK double crochet instead of an American one you quickly see that it’s a big, difference as the height of the stitch is taller – this, aside from being really annoying when you realise, affects the whole pattern so you need to get it right!

This had a profound affect on me when I came to design my own patterns. I didn’t want people to have to flick backwards and forwards so I started writing both abbreviations straight into all my patterns (with the UK terminology first) e.g. * 1 htr/hdc in the next st, 1 tr/dc in the next, 3 dtr/tr in the next st, 1 tr/dc in the next st, 1 htr/hdc in the next st, 1 dc/sc in the next st *. I know most people could translate the pattern themselves but I always think it’s nicer to have things done for you!

So what are the differences?

British Crochet American Crochet
Double crochet (dc) Single crochet (sc)
Half treble crochet (htr) Half double crochet (hdc)
Treble crochet (tr) Double crochet (dc)
Double treble crochet (dtr) Treble crochet (tr)
Triple treble crochet (ttr) Double treble crochet (dtr)

So why is it different?

I did a bit of searching on the web and couldn’t find a definitive answer (if you know please let me know!) I believe the English call it a double crochet because to perform the stitch you have to wind the yarn around the hook and pull it through leaving TWO loops on your hook, (the same goes for our treble crochet because you get THREE loops on your hook). I think the American terminology comes from the fact you are making a single stitch (rather than how you create the stitch) – so their double crochet is effectively two single crochets – if that makes sense! 

Knowing which is which…

There is a lot of duplication between the abbreviations which can make it tricky to know what terminology it’s written in.  I think in most cases pattern designers these days state somewhere on their pattern what terms the pattern is written in but with older patterns you might have to check in other ways…   

You will pretty much always know if you are working a American terms pattern if they mention single crochet (sc) as that is not used in British terminology.  It’s useful to mention here that Australian patterns are usually written in UK terms.

Another possible way to determine if it’s UK or American is how we describe our hook sizes (though I tend to put both options in my patterns). For UK it tends to be in metric sizes, in US it’s usually done with letters.

British Hook Sizes American Hook Sizes
2.00mm  
2.25mm B
2.50mm  
2.75mm C
3.00mm  
3.25mm D
3.50mm E
3.75mm F
4.00mm G
4.25mm  
4.50mm 7
5.00mm H
5.50mm I
6.00mm J
6.50mm K
7.00mm  
8.00mm L
9.00mm M / N
10.00mm N / P

Same with yarn thickness; in the UK we would say it was 3 ply, 4 ply, double knit or Aran. In the US it’s usually fingering, sport, worsted (in fact I didn’t know what worsted was for the longest time – another reason why I put all name variations in my patterns!). 

Yarn-Aliases

So I hope you have found that helpful, if you have any more useful tips on this subject I’d love to hear them!