KCACO-UK Groovyghan CAL 2016 | Part 1


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Yay let’s get started with Part 1 of the CAL shall we!!!! I’m so excited that so many of you have decided to join in the CAL with me this year!

If this is the first you are hearing about this CAL the full schedule can be found here, to link the groovyghan project on Ravelry click here, or for just this pattern click here.  There is a Facebook support group for this CAL which can be found here and you can use the hashtag #kcacoukcal2015 for FacebookTwitter, Pinterest and Instagram if you want to link in photos and such like on social media.  

For a print friendly version of this page please scroll to the bottom of this post and click on  the Print & PDF button.

Edited to add: This page has now been translated to by the lovely Sarit Grinberg: groovyghan-part1-HEBREW

Part 1: Tri-Tonal Traditional Granny Square 

To me there is nothing more elegant than the traditional granny square – it’s iconic for a reason! It’s probably the first thing I was taught how to make and I still love how it looks.  The granny square was also huge in the 1960’s-1970’s and as much of my groovyghan design is inspired by that period I knew I had to include the granny square in our blanket. I completely didn’t invent this pattern but this is my twist on the timeless classic.

Multi-colour granny squares are a great way to use up small amounts of yarn left over from other projects and the basic granny square motif does not require advanced skills to execute – a perfect starting point to ease us in gently to our groovyghan!  

To try to make this CAL easier for everyone I have included both the written pattern and a photo tutorial of how I have worked this pattern (see below).

01

Written Pattern:

skill2

Tri-Tonal Traditional Granny Square (Make 10):

Notes:

  • Hook: UK 4 mm / US Size G
  • Yarn: Double Knit / 8 ply / Weight #3
  • Yarn Amount required: Each square roughly uses up 33 yds (30 m / 10 g) / Total squares 330 yds (300 m / 100 g)
  • Gauge in double knit / 8ply / yarn weight #3: 6 tr/dc sts or 2 clusters = 1.5 inches / 3.8 cm

If your gauge is different to mine e.g. because you are using a bigger hook and heavier weight yarn all you will need to do is check your own gauge and stick to it – this should mean that the pattern should fit together at the end.

  • Finished square size in double knit / 8ply / yarn weight #3: 5 x 5 inches / 12.7 x 12.7 cm

Pattern uses English (UK) and American (US) crochet terms for a conversion chart click here.

Abbreviations: 

  • st(s) = stitch(es)
  • sp(s) = space(s)
  • sl st = slip stitch
  • ch(s) = chain(s)
  • tr/dc  = UK treble / US double crochet
  • 3tr/dc = 1 Cluster
  • [ ] = work anything in brackets into one space or stitch as specified

Stitch Guidance: 

  • UK Treble / US Double Crochet (tr/dc): Yarn over, insert hook in indicated st and pull up a loop (three loops on hook), yarn over, pull through two loops, yarn over, pull through remaining two loops on hook.

Pattern:

  • Note: Three colours used for each block; referred to in this pattern as YARN A, B and C
  • Note 1: I used the same colour for rnd 3 on all of my granny squares to help with overall coordination – but worked different inners / outers to keep it groovy!
  • Note 2: Once you have completed each square I would suggest you weave in your ends so that I don’t have a major sewing job to do at the end of the groovyghan!

Rnd 1: With YARN A, Ch 4, sl st to form a ring, sl st into the ring, ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), 2 tr/dc into the ring, ch 3, * 3 tr/dc into the ring, ch 3*, repeat from * to * twice more, sl st to top of ch 3 to join, then sl st to the nearest ch 3 corner (12 sts + 4 x 3 ch sps)

Rnd 2:  Ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), [2 tr/dc, ch 3, 3 tr/dc] into the same sp (first corner made), * [3tr/dc, ch 3, 3tr/dc] into the next ch 3 sp * (second corner made), repeat from * to * twice more, sl sl st to top of ch 3 to join, finish off YARN A and weave in ends (24 sts + 4 x 3 ch sps)

Rnd 3: Join YARN B to any ch 3 sp, ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), [2 tr/dc, ch 3, 3 tr/dc] into the same sp (first corner made), * 3tr/dc into the sp between the clusters of the previous round,  [3 tr/dc, ch 3, 3 tr/dc] into the next ch 3 sp (second corner made), * repeat from * to * twice more, sl st to top of ch 3 to join, finish off YARN B and weave in ends (36 sts + 4 x 3 ch sps)

Rnd 4: Join YARN C to any ch 3 sp, ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), [2 tr/dc, ch 3, 3 tr/dc] into the same sp (first corner made), * 3tr/dc into the sp between the clusters of the previous round, 3 tr/dc into the next sp,  [3 tr/dc, ch 3, 3 tr/dc] into the next ch 3 sp (second corner made), * repeat from * to * twice more, sl st to top of ch 3 to join, then sl st to the nearest ch 3 corner (48 sts + 4 x 3 ch sps)

Rnd 5: Ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), [2 tr/dc, ch 3, 3 tr/dc] into the same sp (first corner made), * 3tr/dc into the sp between the clusters of the previous round, 3 tr/dc into the next sp, 3tr/dc into the next sp [3 tr/dc, ch 3, 3 tr/dc] into the next ch 3 sp (second corner made), * repeat from * to * twice more, sl st to top of ch 3 to join,  finish off YARN C and weave in ends (60 sts + 4 x 3 ch sps)

See below for details on blocking and joining your squares together to complete Part 1 of the CAL and below that a photo tutorial for the pattern.

Chart:   

KCACOUK CAL 2016 - Part 1

For crochet symbols in English (UK) and American (US) crochet terms click here.

Blocking:

Some of the patterns in the CAL may need to be ‘blocked’ so that they are equal on all sides (not curling) and fit the size dimensions of the pattern.   If you are unfamiliar with what blocking means / or how to do it then please check out the following links:

You may already have blocking boards to hand but if not anything you can firmly pin your square to will do e.g. a folded up towel or an ironing board.

Part 1 finished square size in double knit / 8ply / yarn weight #3 should be 5 x 5 inches / 12.7 x 12.7 cm (your block maybe slightly larger if using worsted / aran / 10ply / yarn weight #4)

Blocking

Joining:

  • Tip 1: Use stitch markers or knit clips to hold your squares steady and lined up whilst you join them together.
  • Tip 2: Do not pull your yarn too tight when working your joins. Generally you should have the same sort of stretch that the crochet squares have.

Join your granny squares together in one long strip for PART 1 (please refer to the CAL schematic for details) by slip stitching in the front loop only on the wrong side of the work; 

  1. line up your blocks so the edges and stitches match,
  2. then start sl st in the front loop only, starting at the last ch of a ch 3 sp, and along each edge, working the stitches through both squares and joining on the first ch of the ch 3 sp – 17 sts in total joined.

Joining

Photo Tutorial:

Tri-Tonal Traditional Granny Square (Make 10):

1. Rnd 1: With YARN A, Ch 4, sl st to form a ring

01-TUT

2. Ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc)

02-TUT

3. 2 tr/dc into the ring,

03-TUT

 4. ch 3, * 3 tr/dc into the ring,

05-TUT

5. ch 3*, repeat from * to * twice more, sl st to top of ch 3 to join,

06-TUT

6. then sl st to the nearest ch 3 corner (12 sts + 4 x 3 ch sps)

07-TUT

7. Rnd 2: Ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), [2 tr/dc, ch 3, 3 tr/dc] into the same sp (first corner made),

08-TUT

8. * [3tr/dc, ch 3, 3tr/dc] into the next ch 3 sp * (second corner made),

09-TUT

9. repeat from * to * twice more, sl st to top of ch 3 to join, finish off YARN A and weave in ends (24 sts + 4 x 3 ch sps)

10-TUT

10. Rnd 3: Join YARN B to any ch 3 sp, ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), [2 tr/dc, ch 3, 3 tr/dc] into the same sp (first corner made), * 3tr/dc into the sp between the clusters of the previous round,

11-TUT

11.  [3 tr/dc, ch 3, 3 tr/dc] into the next ch 3 sp (second corner made), * repeat from * to * twice more, sl st to top of ch 3 to join, finish off YARN B and weave in ends (36 sts + 4 x 3 ch sps)

12-TUT

12. Rnd 4: Join YARN C to any ch 3 sp, ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), [2 tr/dc, ch 3, 3 tr/dc] into the same sp (first corner made),

13-TUT

13. * 3tr/dc into the sp between the clusters of the previous round, 3 tr/dc into the next sp,

14-TUT

14.  [3 tr/dc, ch 3, 3 tr/dc] into the next ch 3 sp (second corner made), * repeat from * to * twice more, sl st to top of ch 3 to join, then sl st to the nearest ch 3 corner (48 sts + 4 x 3 ch sps)

15-TUT

15. Rnd 5: Ch 3 (counts as first tr/dc), [2 tr/dc, ch 3, 3 tr/dc] into the same sp (first corner made), * 3tr/dc into the sp between the clusters of the previous round, 3 tr/dc into the next sp, 3tr/dc into the next sp [3 tr/dc, ch 3, 3 tr/dc] into the next ch 3 sp (second corner made), * repeat from * to * twice more, sl st to top of ch 3 to join (60 sts + 4 x 3 ch sps)

16-TUT

And that’s it! Part 1 completed!

Don’t forget to stay tuned for Part 2 to be released on 27th January 2016.

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23 thoughts on “KCACO-UK Groovyghan CAL 2016 | Part 1

  1. I absolutely love this!!!! For a beginner like me this 1st pattern is ideal. Love the tutorials. Great attention to detail. Thank you.

    • Hi, The way I have designed the groovyghan means that pieces really need to be either slip-stitched / or whip-stitched (sewn) together for a close join of each piece. Unfortunately if you don’t join in this way I can not guarantee that the end design will work out as it should 🙂

  2. I am absolutely loving this groovyghan, I have done a CAL in the past but only after the event, I always had all the parts up front, THIS IS SO EXITING!!! I love my colour choice too, I CANT WAIT FOR NEXT WEEK!!!!😁

  3. Never been involved in a CAL before and just discovered it yesterday, so need to catch up! Started on part 1 and loving it loving it!

  4. Hello,
    I love this CAL and I am thinking of starting it. How important is blocking? I am not sure about how to do this, so thinking of skipping the step…

    • Hi, I know the majority of the blocks in the groovyghan don’t need blocking, but if you find your pieces are curling or not lying straight that’s when you might want to try blocking. Then again you may find that when you join your pieces that this helps with their shape too. I’m actually planning to write a post about blocking as it’s something that quite a few people have said they are not sure about so that might help you too 🙂

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